bittah.com!~ Privacy in the gaze of PRISM etc

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Post » Mon Jul 22, 2013 11:08 am

Privacy in the gaze of PRISM etc

http://www.truthdig.com/eartotheground/ ... Ig.twitter
Chat: Cryptocat is a free, open-source chat application available in 32 languages. Like other instant messengers, Crytpocat lets you chat in real time with other people online—but this service is encrypted. You can download Cryptocat for Chrome, Safari, Firefox or the Mac. [Link]

Email: Concerned that Google might be sharing your information with the man (despite protestations to the contrary)? You can encrypt your Gmail with one click using Secure Gmail, an open-source Chrome extension. According to Lifehacker, “Once installed, you’ll see a lock icon right next to the ‘Compose’ button in Gmail. Click it to enter ‘secure compose’ mode, where your message text will be encrypted before you send it, and no drafts are saved to Google’s servers, so you don’t have unencrypted data at rest. You’ll be prompted to enter a password that the recipient will have to use to decrypt the message when they get it.” If you don’t use Chrome or Gmail, try Mailvelope. [Link]

Phone/Text/Email: One of the most famous names in encryption is Phil Zimmermann, the father of Pretty Good Privacy. Zimmermann now has a company called Silent Circle, which offers a range of cryptographic services to everyone from regular humans to corporate stooges to aspiring mercenaries. Want to have a truly private phone call? This may be your best bet. The catch: Silent Circle charges a fee. [Link]

Text Message/Video Chat: Apple fanatics may have something to crow about here. Although the tech company was on that famous list of PRISM cooperators, Apple has said it can’t snoop on customers using its FaceTime and iMessage services even if it wanted to. That’s because both, according to the company, use end-to-end encryption by default. Those services are available to anyone using Apple phones, tablets or computers. [Link]

Web: No matter how you browse the Internet or what you do with it, one of the best ways to hide your identity and safeguard your privacy is to use a VPN, or Virtual Private Network. This essentially routes all of your Internet traffic through a third party that anonymizes your traffic for you. Unfortunately, a good VPN typically costs money, and you have to hope that the company providing the service is both honest and willing to stand up to government pressure. Some VPNs advertise that they intentionally do not keep server logs, so they cannot comply with government requests for private information. VPN setup can be tricky for the not-so-tech-savvy. One service that makes connecting fairly simple is Privateinternetaccess.
What do we all think of this?
ImPaLoR
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Post » Mon Jul 22, 2013 11:47 am

Re: Privacy in the gaze of PRISM etc

How stoned are you right now?
Kroz-
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Post » Mon Jul 22, 2013 12:05 pm

based on my emails, browser history, sms or phone calls i don't think i'll be going to guantanamo any time soon. i'm under no illusions about "internet privacy", just not sure that i care. maybe i should, idk
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Nasty Hobbit
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Post » Mon Jul 22, 2013 2:19 pm

Image
I see fear in women's eyes when i show them my obscure forms of online communication.
Lambda
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Post » Mon Jul 22, 2013 2:50 pm

based on my emails, browser history, sms or phone calls i don't think i'll be going to guantanamo any time soon
Made any sarcastic comments on the internet yet?
http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/12/tech/ ... ailed-teen
shikarri
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Post » Mon Jul 22, 2013 4:03 pm

sounds about right for 'merika
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Post » Thu Aug 01, 2013 12:14 am

Re: Privacy in the gaze of PRISM etc

based on my emails, browser history, sms or phone calls i don't think i'll be going to guantanamo any time soon. i'm under no illusions about "internet privacy", just not sure that i care. maybe i should, idk
Image
I can't remember who said it, but if you aren't worried about your privacy in the hands of governments & corporations then you should have no concern posting all your personal info, medical history, bank accounts etc on a public site for all your fellow citizens to see...for if you trust govt/corp, you surely trust your fellow citizens...right?
Iscariot
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Post » Thu Aug 01, 2013 11:51 am

I can't remember who said it, but if you aren't worried about your privacy in the hands of governments & corporations then you should have no concern posting all your personal info, medical history, bank accounts etc on a public site for all your fellow citizens to see...for if you trust govt/corp, you surely trust your fellow citizens...right?
I trust them to be the self-centered selfish creatures that we are and not give a shit about my life unless it was obviously very little effort in return for the reward of identity or material theft.

Conspiracists and fearmongers like yourself consistently underestimate human apathy and overestimate human indecency.
philmarcracken
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Post » Thu Aug 01, 2013 12:53 pm

What is this? Big Brother?
[quote="Conspiracists Re:trial of a "whistleblower""]
Free our hero
[/quote]

It goes both ways :lurk:
Freddy
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Post » Thu Aug 01, 2013 7:25 pm

Re: Privacy in the gaze of PRISM etc

Heh "protecting the Afghan people is one of our primary concerns".

You mean like this?

And Phil, it's not about under or over estimating anything (except perhaps your own apathy & lack of foresight) - it's about safeguarding for the future. Things happen by degrees, and history is riddled with examples of slow descents into extremism of all forms, but especially tyranny. "The price of liberty is eternal vigilance"

I'm pretty sure you were the same guy who called alert people "conspiracy nuts" when Bush passed his Homeland Security/Patriot Acts a decade ago, yet here we are now with a lovely Prism system, state sanctioned murder & the outlawing of whistleblowers.

Yeah, everything is just peachy & heading in the right direction! :roll:
Iscariot
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Post » Thu Aug 01, 2013 7:42 pm

It is clearer now than ever that, since we can’t retrospectively change these surveillance technologies, and indeed there may be valid uses of them, citizens of all countries need to stand together to demand three new kinds of digital rights.

We must have rights to personal data control. Knowing what, when, and how much of our personal data has been collected, and which agencies have access it to it.

We must have rights to transparent security institution oversight. Parliamentary and legal procedures must be in place to ensure that all searches of such data require strictly evidenced belief that a search is necessary, that searches are narrowly targeted, and that citizens have methods to access the details of such proceedings.

We must have rights to meaningful checks and responses to abuses. If there is any kind of problem with the use or integrity of data in such systems (such as overreach of searches, searches for non-security/law-enforcement purposes, data breaches) then citizens must have the right to meaningful civil and legal recourse. News website Mashable is currently running a campaign to crowdsource a digital bill of rights.

Australians should be involved in that because some of our traffic relies on US services and, as such, US laws. Australians should also engage with their political parties and civil society groups, such as Electronic Frontiers Australia (of which I am a board member) and its Citizens, Not Suspects campaign.

With an election looming, now is the time for meaningful action. Whether or not one trusts our government or others, trusts security services/law enforcement or not, or believes that it is or is not reasonable to trade privacy for security, new digital rights to choice, control, and transparency will ensure our civil security.
https://www.efa.org.au/2013/08/01/xkeyscore/
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Post » Thu Aug 01, 2013 8:35 pm

My point was citizens, large organizations and countries alike are entitled to protect their private information for reasons other than hiding their dirty laundry (maintaining competitive edge, maintaining relationships, etc.). Simples; not justifying the actions of one side.

And yes, there are more cockups in war than in a Thai brothel in summer.
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Post » Fri Aug 02, 2013 1:36 pm


And Phil, it's not about under or over estimating anything (except perhaps your own apathy & lack of foresight) - it's about safeguarding for the future. Things happen by degrees, and history is riddled with examples of slow descents into extremism of all forms, but especially tyranny. "The price of liberty is eternal vigilance"

I'm pretty sure you were the same guy who called alert people "conspiracy nuts" when Bush passed his Homeland Security/Patriot Acts a decade ago, yet here we are now with a lovely Prism system, state sanctioned murder & the outlawing of whistleblowers.

Yeah, everything is just peachy & heading in the right direction! :roll:
So they're coming for me in my unit block, in geraldton, western australia yeah? Do i have some time to pack or do the drones and black helicopters just follow my sekret gps implants in my anus?

State sanctioned murder(ers) are called soldiers bro. The government directs them at threats both foreign and national.. isn't that, like, common knowledge

Whistleblowers are/were under some form of legal contract that they broke. 'but muh liberty!!!'
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Post » Fri Aug 02, 2013 1:42 pm

just don't google backpacks and pressure cookers :wink:

i'm kind of hoping there's a big difference between freedom in america and the rest of the world
Nasty Hobbit
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Post » Fri Aug 02, 2013 2:29 pm

Re: Privacy in the gaze of PRISM etc

Jesus. Whilst I know Phil was using hyperbole to reinforce his (rapidly diminishing) point, I couldn't have asked for a better link to counter his claims of black choppers etc.

I'm not in the "they're coming to get me" camp - I'm more about safeguarding fundamental human rights against present & future abuses.

I'll post more on state sanctioned murder & whistleblowers later (suffice to say Phil your interpretation is deeply flawed) as I'm on the move at the moment.
Iscariot
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Post » Fri Aug 02, 2013 8:18 pm

just don't google backpacks and pressure cookers :wink:

i'm kind of hoping there's a big difference between freedom in america and the rest of the world
....*knock knock*
...."we want to ..."
...."you have a search warrant???....no????....fuck off."


end of story. dumb yanks (In CT here...warrants are requested and issued before anything is done)
Riker
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Post » Fri Aug 02, 2013 8:32 pm

Nothing irks me more then those people who say, "if you've got nothing to hide you should have no problem with government spying."

On a semi related note, why isn't Ron Paul president yet? He seems to be the only man with the potential to improve america

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifJG_oFFDK0[/youtube]
shikarri
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Post » Fri Aug 02, 2013 8:34 pm

On a semi related note, why isn't Ron Paul president yet?
This is why
punk
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Post » Fri Aug 02, 2013 8:44 pm

Forgive me if I'm misinterpreting karps message (I havn't read the book, just what the general gist is) but it reminds me of this
Spoiler: Show
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shikarri
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Post » Fri Sep 06, 2013 2:16 pm

http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/security-i ... hv1ma.html
Beginning in 2000, as encryption tools were gradually blanketing the web, the NSA invested billions of dollars in a clandestine campaign to preserve its ability to eavesdrop. Having lost a public battle in the 1990s to insert its own "back door" in all encryption, it set out to accomplish the same goal by stealth.
hmm
ImPaLoR
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